Laure et Jane Dumond

Florian & Michael Quistrebert

15 September – 3 November 2012

Laure and Jane Dumond / Florian and Michaël Quistrebert. It’s the fraternal story of a double act. For this end of summer exhibition, the Quistrebert brothers have decided to up the ante on the singularity of their choice to paint as a pair that is related to each other. The title, in a nod to Duchamp, plays on linguistic slip- page (the mispronunciation of which suggests the title of a famous painting by Courbet). This fourhanded oeuvre likes to multiply the figure of the double with its share of visual metaphors and symmetries, in a play of echoes and responses between the centre and the periphery. With this unstable title, the Quistrebert broth- ers announce a twofold programme, just another stage of their research into abstract painting’s formal solu- tions in the present day. For instance, how an inherently primordial form is produced? And how this original form is thought of in a comprehensive, mobile and generative manner?
It begs the question of exactly which “origin of the world” the Quistreberts are chafing against in their paint- ings and videos. On the face of it, it is not a question of capturing the morphogenesis of the first moment (the original nucleus, in the manner of the Genetic Moment in Barnett Newman), but rather to consider various situations of the subject faced with the mechanics sensitive to the emergence of forms, and how this metaphorical relation to the work answers to archetypes of the Universe’s workings, currently confirmed by the latest developments in astrophysics. A far from stable place is constantly renegotiated in a game of per- ceptual disturbances and proprioceptive disruption, the prerogative of optical art in the sixties - a generation which the Quistreberts converse with here in counterpoint, in far more than a mere revival. The retinal flirt- ing of optical art was fixed on a re-appropriation of the work by the viewer / actor, according to a physiologi- cal bias of perception, which replaced the observer at the heart of art displacing the authority of the creator (Duchamp and his proto-kinetic Rotoreliefs recalled that “the viewer completes the work of art”). Here, it is rather about providing the keys to a poetic repositioning of the eye in the cosmic order of things.
The abstract forms that the Quistreberts are proposing surf on a physical order, which is not only based in the vibrating surface of things (the opticaliste itch), but part of the multifaceted tiering of forms and phenomena (microcosm/ macrocosm). Hence, the recourse to visual devices conducive to vertiginous rapture, keeping in their sights a dive into the heart of the mechanisms of the cosmos. Upon entering the Crèvecoeur gallery, two medium sized formats are positioned face-to-face, two diptychs in which the iterative geometry establishes an ad infinitum duplication (the kaleidoscope, a fun optical instrument that emerged in the mid-nineteenth century, historically linked to the mechanisation of the sense of infinity). The viral multiplication of primary geometric forms (diamonds / squares / ellipses) takes the form of constellations and trajectories, the rotat- ing rhythm of which is rendered more explicit (the principle of revolution), on an increasingly monumental scale, with the two twin pictures of the back room: two screens (283 x 195cm) of phosphorescent nuances reflecting each other in optical games derived from the simplest Gestalt, propelling the eye into the vortex of a cinematic space with multiple entries (and exits).
Between these two involutional devices, wherein the form spirals in upon itself in mirrored Moebius effect, in itself a form of doublure, a video is screened in total darkness, a black box conducive to the hypnotic fascination of the gaze. One is reminded here of the archaic technique of fixing a point of light, the basis of the first developments of medical hypnosis that did indeed offer a rereading of the subject’s doublures (conscious / unconscious), notably through the split personality in “altered states of consciousness”. In this cinematographic niche, the Quistreberts present us with their latest video entitled Dots. It is produced from captured video images; extreme high angles of a traditional dervish’s dance, the samà. The dervish whirls faster and faster in a frenetic race that drives the consciousness into trance, with the body a means of attaining
an ecstatic grace, through the individual’s heady dissolution within a divine and transcendent entity. The der- vish, converted here to a luminous galactic point, is a point of attachment for the gaze, tallying with recent discoveries in astrophysics on the gravitational movement of the body around a moving centre. Thus, Dots mischievously combines astrophysics and ancient ecstasy inducing techniques, Sufism and abstract optical- isme in a combination of shapes and references, which defeats the established order of cultural registers (East / West; pure abstraction / decorative arts; Islamic arabesque / musicaliste line; experimental science / esoteri- cism; religion / entertainment etc.).
This work is an undisguised tribute to the history of the attempts at audio visualisation, a Visual Music of which the animated vocabulary of abstraction has, as we know, always had to do with the Pythagorean back- ground of a “music of the spheres” (from the Whitney Brothers mandalas to Norman McLaren’s experimental films). But contrary to John Whitney, who early adopted computer digital technologies to deploy this psy- chedelic sense of the infinite, the Quistrebert brothers resort to the use of analogue equipment (the swirling dervishes) to digitally draw the geometric pattern and stimulate the intoxication of the gaze. The term analogy is important because it refers precisely to this relation of scale between underworld and cosmos. As recently shown by the historian Barbara Stafford, the analogy is strikingly relevant in contemporary thought, especially in simulation technologies and the latest cognitive approaches to identity. For the analogy posits a likeness of relations between two objects, not based on formal and specific properties of these objects, but on the recipro- cal relations between these properties. It is in this a singular form of resemblance in direct contact with the thorny issue of abstraction. Instead of a simple “relation of likeness” (the one encountered in the illusionist project of figurative painting), it initiates a “likeness ratio” (the more abstract principle and a mathematical proportion of digital kinship). The analogy imposes a relational similitude, emphasising the barely concealed desire of a coïncidencia between individuals and the world, the old dream of “the analogy between all beings”. The analogy is a matter of abstract mediation between orders, realms, senses and beings, whose ultimate goal is to better reveal a tightly woven fabric of relations between visible and invisible, identifiable and unknown, Body and Cosmos. It is only through multiple quantitative differences (brightness, opacity, density, colour, hue, timbre, texture, etc.) more weighted than neutralised that the “likeness ratio” provides some form of geometric equality referring to a possible permanence of things, a mathematical secret of quality in which the spectator will project, beyond the apparent chaos, a desire for unity. This is a zone of the buried desire that the Quistrebert brothers attempt to approach, in a very empirical and experimental way, sometimes amused and uncontrolled, in their little pataphysical investigation into the World’s origin.

Pascal Rousseau
Translated by Audrey Concannon

*The word doublure has several meanings. It is a lining for clothing, an understudy for a play and a body double or stand-in in cinema.

Dots, Acknowledgment:
Philippe Bieth (Swirling Dervish), Eric Guichard (Cinematography), Aurélien Dubois (Focus Puller), Jeff Garreau (Key Grip), Christian Vicq (Gaffer)
Thank you: Guillaume de Nadaï, Sarah Guichard, Raphaël Neal, Gérard Quilès, Derviche Caravane, AIM 2012, RABK, Le Plateau - FRAC Ile de France, Le Pavillon OBC Neuflize, laboratoire de création du Palais de Tokyo.


Doublures

Laure et Jane Dumond/Florian et Michael Quistrebert. Une histoire fraternelle de duo. Pour cette exposition de rentrée, les frères Quistrebert surenchérissent sur la singularité du choix à peindre à deux, en famille, par le clin d’œil duchampien d’un titre jouant sur les dérapages langagiers (la prononciation écorchée du titre fait apparaître l’intitulé d’un fameux tableau de Courbet). Une œuvre à quatre mains qui se plait à multiplier la figure du double, avec son lot de métaphores visuelles, les symétries, les jeux d’échos et de répons entre le centre et la périphérie. Avec ce titre décalé, les frères Quistrebert annoncent un double programme qui n’est qu’une étape supplémentaire dans leur recherche sur les solutions formelles de la peinture abstraite aujourd’hui. Comment produire une forme primordiale, originaire ? Comment penser cette forme d’origine de manière globale, mobile et générative ?
On se demandera donc à quelle « origine du monde » les Quistrebert se frottent dans leurs peintures et vid- éos. A priori, il ne s’agit pas de capturer la morphogénèse du premier moment (le noyau primitif, à la manière du Genetic Moment chez Barnett Newmann) mais plutôt d’envisager diverses situations du sujet face à la mécanique sensible de l’apparition des formes, et la façon dont cette relation métaphorique à l’œuvre rend compte d’archétypes du fonctionnement de l’Univers, confirmés aujourd’hui par les derniers développe- ments de l’astrophysique. Une place qui loin d’être stable est en permanence renégociée, dans un jeu de troubles perceptifs et de déstabilisation proprioceptive qui aura été l’apanage de l’art optique des années soixante - une génération avec laquelle les Quistrebert dialoguent ici en contrepoint, beaucoup plus qu’en simple revival. Le flirt rétinien de l’art optique était rivé sur une réappropriation de l’œuvre par le specta- teur/acteur, selon un parti-pris physiologique de la perception qui replaçait l’observateur au cœur de l’art, en déplaçant l’autorité du créateur (Duchamp et ses Rotoreliefs proto-cinétiques rappelait que « ce sont les regardeurs qui font le tableau »). Là, il s’agit plutôt de fournir les clés d’un repositionnement poétique de l’œil dans l’ordre cosmique des choses.
Les formes abstraites que nous proposent les Quistrebert surfent sur un ordre physique qui n’est plus seule- ment installé à la surface vibratoire des choses (le chatouillement opticaliste) mais inscrit dans l’étagement pluridimensionnel des formes et des phénomènes (microcosme/macrocosme). D’où le recours à des dis- positifs visuels propices au vertige, avec en ligne de mire une plongée au cœur des mécanismes du cosmos. A l’entrée de la galerie Crèvecoeur, deux moyens formats se font vis à vis, deux diptyques dont la géométrie itérative instaure une duplication à l’infini (le kaléidoscope, un instrument d’optique amusante apparu au milieu du XIXème siècle, est historiquement lié à la mécanisation du sentiment d’infinitude). La démultipli- cation virale de formes géométriques primaires (losanges/carrés/ellipses) prend la forme de constellations et de trajectoires dont le rythme giratoire se fait plus explicite (le principe de la révolution) sur une échelle plus monumentale, avec les deux tableaux jumeaux de la salle du fond : deux écrans (283 x 195 cm) aux nuances phosphorescentes se reflétant l’un l’autre dans des jeux d’optiques issus d’une Gestlat des plus simples qui propulse le regard dans le vortex d’un espace cinématique à multiples entrées (et sorties).
Entre ces deux dispositifs involutifs où la forme s’enveloppe sur elle-même dans un effet de Moebius en miroir qui est en soi une forme de doublure, s’interpose une vidéo projetée dans le noir le plus complet, une black box propice à la fascination hypnotique du regard. On retrouve ici la technique archaïque d’une fixa- tion d’un point lumineux, à la base des premiers développements de l’hypnose médicale qui proposaient justement une relecture des doublures du sujet (conscient/inconscient), notamment à travers le dédoublement de la personnalité sous « état modifié de conscience ». Dans cette alcôve cinématographique, les Quistrebert nous présentent leur toute dernière vidéo, Dots. Elle est réalisée à partir de la capture vidéo, en plongée
zénithale, d’une danse traditionnelle d’un derviche tourneur, le samà. Le derviche tourne de plus en plus rapidement dans une course effrénée qui propulse la conscience dans la transe, le corps devenant le moyen de frayage de la grâce, dans la dissolution grisante de l’individu au sein d’une entité divine qui le dépasse. Le derviche, converti ici en point lumineux galactique, point de fixation du regard, rejoint ici les récentes découvertes sur le mouvement gravitationnel des corps autour d’un centre qui se déplace. Dots combine ainsi malicieusement astrophysique et techniques ancestrales d’extase, soufisme et opticalisme abstrait, dans un amalgame de formes et de références qui défait les catégories de registres culturels (Orient/Occident ; ab- straction pure/arts décoratifs ; arabesque islamique/ligne musicaliste ; sciences expérimentales/ésotérisme, religion/divertissement, etc...).
L’œuvre est un hommage non dissimulé à l’histoire des tentatives de visualisation du son, une Visual Music dont le vocabulaire de l’abstraction animée a, on le sait, toujours eu à voir avec l’arrière-plan pythagoricien d’une « musique des sphères » (des mandalas des frères Whitney aux films expérimentaux de Norman McLaren). Mais contrairement à John Withney, qui très tôt a adopté la technologie numérique de l’ordinateur pour déployer ce sens psychédélique de l’infini, les frères Quistrebert recourent à un matériau analogique (les volutes du derviche) pour dessiner digitalement le motif géométrique et impulser l’ivresse du regard. Analogie : le terme a son importance, car il renvoie justement à ce rapport d’échelle entre inframonde et cosmos. Comme l’a montré récemment l’historienne Barbara Stafford, l’analogie trouve une surprenante actualité dans la pensée contemporaine, notamment autour des technologies de la simulation et des récentes approches cognitives de l’identité. Car l’analogie postule une similitude de rapport entre deux objets, non pas basée sur des propriétés formelles et particulières de ces objets, mais sur les rapports réciproques en- tre ces mêmes propriétés. Elle est, en cela, une forme singulière de ressemblance, en contact direct avec l’épineuse question de l’abstraction. Au lieu d’être un simple « rapport de ressemblance » (celui que l’on rencontre dans le projet illusionniste de la peinture figurative), elle engage une « ressemblance de rapport » (le principe, plus abstrait, d’une proportion mathématique et d’une parenté numérique). L’analogie impose une similitude relationnelle, soulignant le désir à peine camouflé d’une coïncidencia entre les individus et le Monde, le vieux rêve de « l’analogie entre tous les êtres ». L’analogie est une affaire de médiation abstraite entre les ordres, les règnes, les échelles, les sens et les êtres dont l’objectif ultime est de mieux révéler un tissu serré de relations entre visible et invisible, identifiable et inconnu, Corps et Cosmos. Ce n’est qu’au prix de multiples écarts quantitatifs (luminosité, opacité, solidité, couleurs, teintes, timbres, textures, ...) que la « similitude de rapport » assure une certaine forme d’égalité géométrique renvoyant à une possible perma- nence des choses, une mathématique secrète de la qualité dans laquelle le spectateur va projeter, au-delà du chaos apparent, son désir d’unité. C’est une parcelle de ce désir enfoui que tentent d’approcher, de manière très empirique et expérimentale, parfois amusée et incontrôlée, les frères Quistrebert dans leur petite quête pataphysique de l’origine du Monde.

Pascal Rousseau

Dots, remerciements :
Philippe Bieth (derviche tourneur), Eric Guichard (image), Aurélien Dubois (assistant caméra), Jeff Garreau (chef machiniste), Christian Vicq (chef électricien).
Merci à Guillaume de Nadaï, Sarah Guichard, Raphaël Neal, Derviche Caravane, AIM 2012, RABK, Le Plateau - FRAC Ile de France, Le Pavillon OBC Neuflize, laboratoire de création du Palais de Tokyo.


Laure and Jane Dumond / Florian and Michaël Quistrebert. It’s the fraternal story of a double act. For this end of summer exhibition, the Quistrebert brothers have decided to up the ante on the singularity of their choice to paint as a pair that is related to each other. The title, in a nod to Duchamp, plays on linguistic slip- page (the mispronunciation of which suggests the title of a famous painting by Courbet). This fourhanded oeuvre likes to multiply the figure of the double with its share of visual metaphors and symmetries, in a play of echoes and responses between the centre and the periphery. With this unstable title, the Quistrebert broth- ers announce a twofold programme, just another stage of their research into abstract painting’s formal solu- tions in the present day. For instance, how an inherently primordial form is produced? And how this original form is thought of in a comprehensive, mobile and generative manner?
It begs the question of exactly which “origin of the world” the Quistreberts are chafing against in their paint- ings and videos. On the face of it, it is not a question of capturing the morphogenesis of the first moment (the original nucleus, in the manner of the Genetic Moment in Barnett Newman), but rather to consider various situations of the subject faced with the mechanics sensitive to the emergence of forms, and how this metaphorical relation to the work answers to archetypes of the Universe’s workings, currently confirmed by the latest developments in astrophysics. A far from stable place is constantly renegotiated in a game of per- ceptual disturbances and proprioceptive disruption, the prerogative of optical art in the sixties - a generation which the Quistreberts converse with here in counterpoint, in far more than a mere revival. The retinal flirt- ing of optical art was fixed on a re-appropriation of the work by the viewer / actor, according to a physiologi- cal bias of perception, which replaced the observer at the heart of art displacing the authority of the creator (Duchamp and his proto-kinetic Rotoreliefs recalled that “the viewer completes the work of art”). Here, it is rather about providing the keys to a poetic repositioning of the eye in the cosmic order of things.
The abstract forms that the Quistreberts are proposing surf on a physical order, which is not only based in the vibrating surface of things (the opticaliste itch), but part of the multifaceted tiering of forms and phenomena (microcosm/ macrocosm). Hence, the recourse to visual devices conducive to vertiginous rapture, keeping in their sights a dive into the heart of the mechanisms of the cosmos. Upon entering the Crèvecoeur gallery, two medium sized formats are positioned face-to-face, two diptychs in which the iterative geometry establishes an ad infinitum duplication (the kaleidoscope, a fun optical instrument that emerged in the mid-nineteenth century, historically linked to the mechanisation of the sense of infinity). The viral multiplication of primary geometric forms (diamonds / squares / ellipses) takes the form of constellations and trajectories, the rotat- ing rhythm of which is rendered more explicit (the principle of revolution), on an increasingly monumental scale, with the two twin pictures of the back room: two screens (283 x 195cm) of phosphorescent nuances reflecting each other in optical games derived from the simplest Gestalt, propelling the eye into the vortex of a cinematic space with multiple entries (and exits).
Between these two involutional devices, wherein the form spirals in upon itself in mirrored Moebius effect, in itself a form of doublure, a video is screened in total darkness, a black box conducive to the hypnotic fascination of the gaze. One is reminded here of the archaic technique of fixing a point of light, the basis of the first developments of medical hypnosis that did indeed offer a rereading of the subject’s doublures (conscious / unconscious), notably through the split personality in “altered states of consciousness”. In this cinematographic niche, the Quistreberts present us with their latest video entitled Dots. It is produced from captured video images; extreme high angles of a traditional dervish’s dance, the samà. The dervish whirls faster and faster in a frenetic race that drives the consciousness into trance, with the body a means of attaining
an ecstatic grace, through the individual’s heady dissolution within a divine and transcendent entity. The der- vish, converted here to a luminous galactic point, is a point of attachment for the gaze, tallying with recent discoveries in astrophysics on the gravitational movement of the body around a moving centre. Thus, Dots mischievously combines astrophysics and ancient ecstasy inducing techniques, Sufism and abstract optical- isme in a combination of shapes and references, which defeats the established order of cultural registers (East / West; pure abstraction / decorative arts; Islamic arabesque / musicaliste line; experimental science / esoteri- cism; religion / entertainment etc.).
This work is an undisguised tribute to the history of the attempts at audio visualisation, a Visual Music of which the animated vocabulary of abstraction has, as we know, always had to do with the Pythagorean back- ground of a “music of the spheres” (from the Whitney Brothers mandalas to Norman McLaren’s experimental films). But contrary to John Whitney, who early adopted computer digital technologies to deploy this psy- chedelic sense of the infinite, the Quistrebert brothers resort to the use of analogue equipment (the swirling dervishes) to digitally draw the geometric pattern and stimulate the intoxication of the gaze. The term analogy is important because it refers precisely to this relation of scale between underworld and cosmos. As recently shown by the historian Barbara Stafford, the analogy is strikingly relevant in contemporary thought, especially in simulation technologies and the latest cognitive approaches to identity. For the analogy posits a likeness of relations between two objects, not based on formal and specific properties of these objects, but on the recipro- cal relations between these properties. It is in this a singular form of resemblance in direct contact with the thorny issue of abstraction. Instead of a simple “relation of likeness” (the one encountered in the illusionist project of figurative painting), it initiates a “likeness ratio” (the more abstract principle and a mathematical proportion of digital kinship). The analogy imposes a relational similitude, emphasising the barely concealed desire of a coïncidencia between individuals and the world, the old dream of “the analogy between all beings”. The analogy is a matter of abstract mediation between orders, realms, senses and beings, whose ultimate goal is to better reveal a tightly woven fabric of relations between visible and invisible, identifiable and unknown, Body and Cosmos. It is only through multiple quantitative differences (brightness, opacity, density, colour, hue, timbre, texture, etc.) more weighted than neutralised that the “likeness ratio” provides some form of geometric equality referring to a possible permanence of things, a mathematical secret of quality in which the spectator will project, beyond the apparent chaos, a desire for unity. This is a zone of the buried desire that the Quistrebert brothers attempt to approach, in a very empirical and experimental way, sometimes amused and uncontrolled, in their little pataphysical investigation into the World’s origin.

Pascal Rousseau
Translated by Audrey Concannon

*The word doublure has several meanings. It is a lining for clothing, an understudy for a play and a body double or stand-in in cinema.

Dots, Acknowledgment:
Philippe Bieth (Swirling Dervish), Eric Guichard (Cinematography), Aurélien Dubois (Focus Puller), Jeff Garreau (Key Grip), Christian Vicq (Gaffer)
Thank you: Guillaume de Nadaï, Sarah Guichard, Raphaël Neal, Gérard Quilès, Derviche Caravane, AIM 2012, RABK, Le Plateau - FRAC Ile de France, Le Pavillon OBC Neuflize, laboratoire de création du Palais de Tokyo.

  • Laure et Jane Dumond

    Laure et Jane Dumond, Exhibition view at Crèvecoeur, 2012, © Isabelle Giovacchini

  • Laure et Jane Dumond

    In, 2012, bleach on canvas, 70 x 140 cm, © Isabelle Giovacchini

  • Laure et Jane Dumond

    Dots, 2012, video, 8'41, © Isabelle Giovacchini

  • Laure et Jane Dumond

    Dots, 2012, video, 8'41, © Isabelle Giovacchini

  • Laure et Jane Dumond

    Laure et Jane Dumond, Exhibition view at Crèvecoeur, 2012, © Isabelle Giovacchini