The Public Imagination

Erica Baum

13 September – 2 November 2013

Erica Baum has already presented an exhibition entitled The Public Imagination in Lausanne’s Circuit Art Centre (2011). The artist’s first solo exhibition at Crèvecoeur is conceived as the next chapter in an incomplete atlas, which will see the emer- gence of further chapters in the course of 2014. The term atlas is not without significance, as Erica Baum’s exhibitions are displayed in the manner of an orderly collection of maps, reproducing a given space whilst questioning the set of reference and information systems that govern our representation of things, following observation of them.
‘Sightings’ is the title of a book she published with Onestarpress in 2010, which probably launched this working process. The book juxtaposes images and fragments of accounts by anonymous people describing their own sightings of UFOs. The images come from several of Baum’s photographic series. A portion of them titled Newspaper Clippings frames selections of clippings from the New York Times, which appear randomly positioned close together. Others are works from the Naked Eye series, which involved photographing the edges of paperback books shot from the side (also called gutters) whilst being leafed through revealing glimpses of text and image fragments within this vertical frame. Finally, a certain number of more abstract images are featured; reproductions of found images of cloudy skies, in addition to Baum’s own photographs of shad- ows projected onto urban landscapes.
On page 28 of this book, there is a photograph from the Newspaper Clippings series showing several aligned clippings. Only one of them, roughly in the centre of the image, discloses a legible sentence: “captured the public imagination”. This sentence fragment is the source of the exhibition’s title. The sentence is cut, hence the subject and instigator of this “capture” remains unidentified.

On the next page, it says:

“A large elliptical object trailing
a streak of violet light about one third its dimension came straight down
out of the sky, struck the hedges
and bounced straight up again
out of sight”

The Public Imagination, according to Baum, is, above all, a series of observations: hers, of course, but they are based, as they are here, on those of other anonymous observers, her contemporaries, eyewitnesses just like the artist herself, thereby creating a potential public imagination. Depending on the circumstances, this may be apprehended as a universal testimony, or as a collective hallucination, pitched midway between wisdom and crowd hysteria (1). Regardless of knowing the sources and whether they are true or not, what matters is the experimental appropriation, the “capture” that Baum operates in her photographic re-framings (image and text fragments within the image), and which places the emphasis on the ubiquitous ap- pearance of the signs that compose our visual environment: a reflection on a way an epoch examines, to the extent of what remains unexplained therein.
Several series by Baum, dating from different periods, are presented simultaneously at Crèvecoeur. The works are juxtaposed in an exhibition hang that operates like a narrative thread, appearing like so many irrational clues in this work conducted by Baum over many years dedicated to the investigation and interpretation of the signs around us. The works on show are selected from Newspaper Clippings (2010-2013), Naked Eye (2012-2013), and a series of posters comprising found images of birds, urban landscapes, shadows and skies (2013). Lastly, the exhibition includes images from the earliest series, Frick (1998), which arose from Baum’s observation of New York’s Frick Collection library records, where the works were refer- enced by title, date and author, but also by a number of keywords designed to describe them. Baum, by isolating one or a few of these words, composed an object in a new language, such as “squirrels, flying”, which becomes a formula having more to do with a prophecy than with the rational description of a work from the past.
Citing her influences, Baum evokes Brassaï, Atget or Evans, pioneers of the photography of urban landscapes and street scenes where text fragments emerge: a jumble of shop signs, advertising posters, placards, political messages etc. It is said of the photography by Walker Evans that he captured the essence of ‘30s America. In his photograph titled Roadside Gas Station (1929), more than one text is superimposed; the original sign, a half-torn poster and letters sprayed on by an anony- mous hand, thus creating a “random” phrase... It can be deciphered and read as something like: “Any Old Gas A Change the Reference”. Following on from Evans, Baum likewise isolates, starting from printed objects, what Gross names semantic ready-mades (2). This work on language is particularly eloquent at this point in time, as in the words of Goldsmith (3), “by spotlighting the way language describes information systems in analog media Baum makes us aware of how that same lan- guage is used in computing”. The Public Imagination, according to Baum, is also a way to once more raise the question of the relevance of our data systems, and the gaps they leave open with regard to our belief systems.
Erica Baum personal exhibitions have been presented, among others, at Bureau, New York (2011, 2012), Kunstverein Lan- genhagen (2013), Melas Padopoulos, Athens (2013), Sao Paulo Biennale (2012), Circuit, Lausanne (2011) and LuttgenMei- jer, Berlin (2009). Her work has been featured in numerous group shows such as Everyday Epiphanies: Photography and Daily Life since 1969, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (2013), The Feverish Library Cont’d at Capitan Petzel Gallery, Berlin (2013), Coquilles Mécaniques, FRAC Alsace (2012) and Journal d’une chambre, Crèvecoeur (2012). Her work has been acquired by prestigious institutional collections such as The Whitney Museum of American Art, The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

(1) ‘The Crowd Wisdom’ is a 2004 book by James Surowiecki. Its title is an allusion to ‘The Crowd Madness’ by Charles Mackay, pub- lished in 1841.
(2) Béatrice Gross, “Erica Baum’s “wild tumult, (...), of uncertainty,” Or “series of ellipses, hung on around, (...), very subtle in escap- ing...” , in Erica Baum, “Dog Ear”, Ugly Duckling Presse, 2011, Brooklyn, NY
(3) Kenneth Goldsmith, “Wish Me Well and I’ll Love You Still: The Dog Ears of Erica Baum”, in Erica Baum, “Dog Ear”, Ugly Duckling Presse, 2011, Brooklyn, NY


Erica Baum avait déjà intitulé une exposition The Public Imagination, à Lausanne, au centre d’art Circuit, en 2011. Sa pre- mière exposition personnelle à la galerie Crèvecoeur se conçoit comme le nouveau chapitre d’un atlas inachevé, qui verra en naître d’autres au cours de l’année 2014. Le terme atlas n’est pas anodin : à la manière d’un recueil ordonné de cartes, les accrochages d’Erica Baum reproduisent un espace donné tout en interrogeant l’ensemble des systèmes de référencement et d’information qui gouvernent notre représentation des choses, consécutives à leur observation.
Observations, “Sightings”, c’est le titre d’un livre qu’elle a publié en 2010 chez Onestarpress, et qui a probablement in- auguré cette façon de travailler. Le livre juxtapose des images et des fragments de témoignages de personnes anonymes décrivant leur propre observation d’un ovni. Les images proviennent de plusieurs séries photographiques de Baum. Une partie d’entre elles, intitulées Newspaper Clippings (coupures de presse) cadrent des assemblages de coupures du New York Times, qui semblent aléatoirement rapprochées. D’autres sont des oeuvres de la série Naked Eye (oeil nu), qui consiste à photographier les tranches latérales de livres de poche (qu’on appelle aussi les gouttières) en train d’être feuilletés, laissant apparaître des fragments de textes et d’images à l’intérieur de ce cadre vertical. Enfin figure un certain nombre d’images plus abstraites, reproductions d’images trouvées de ciels nuageux, et propres photographies de Baum d’ombres projetées sur des paysages urbains.
A la page 28 de ce livre figure une photographie de la série Newspaper Clippings dans laquelle on voit plusieurs coupures de journaux alignées. Seule l’une d’entre elles, à peu près au centre de l’image, laisse échapper une phrase lisible «captured the public imagination». C’est de là que vient le titre de l’exposition. La phrase est coupée, on ne connaît donc pas son sujet, l’auteur de cette «capture».

A la page suivante, on lit ceci :

“A large elliptical object trailing
a streak of violet light about one third its dimension came straight down
out of the sky, struck the hedges
and bounced straight up again
out of sight”

(“Un gros objet en forme d’ellipse traînant un éclair de lumière violette d’environ un tiers de sa taille est brusquement descendu du ciel, a heurté les haies et a rebondi très haut, hors de notre vue.”)

The Public Imagination, selon Baum, c’est donc avant tout une série d’observations : les siennes, bien sûr, mais elles se fondent, comme ici, dans celles d’autres observateurs anonymes, ses contemporains, des témoins au même titre que l’artiste elle-même, en créant ainsi un possible imaginaire public, qui, selon les cas, peut être saisi comme un témoignage universel, ou comme une hallucination collective, à mi-chemin entre sagesse et folie des foules (1). Peu importe de savoir d’où vien- nent les sources, et si elles sont véridiques, ce qui importe c’est l’appropriation expérimentale, la capture qu’opère Baum dans ses recadrements photographiques (images et fragments de textes dans l’image), et qui mettent en lumière l’aspect ubiquitaire des signes qui composent notre environnement visuel. Reflet d’une façon de regarder d’une époque, jusque dans ce qu’elle a d’inexpliqué.
A la galerie Crèvecoeur sont montrées simultanément plusieurs séries de Baum, de différentes périodes. Les oeuvres se jux- taposent dans un accrochage fonctionnant comme une trame narrative, et apparaissent comme autant d’indices irrationnels de ce travail d’investigation et d’interprétation sur les signes qui nous entourent, mené par Baum depuis de nombreuses années. Y sont présentées des oeuvres de Newspaper Clippings (2010-2013), de Naked Eye (2012-2013), d’une série de posters d’images trouvées d’oiseaux, de paysages urbains, d’ombres et de ciels (2013). Enfin, de la plus ancienne série, Frick (1998), issue d’une observation de Baum des notices de bibliothèque de la collection Frick à New York, où les oeuvres étaient référencées par leur titre, leur date, leur auteur, mais aussi par un certain nombre de mots-clés visant à les décrire. Baum, en isolant un ou quelques-uns de ces mots compose un objet de langage inédit, comme «squirrels, flying», qui devi- ent une formule ayant plus à voir avec une prophétie qu’avec la description rationnelle d’une oeuvre du passé.
Baum, lorsqu’elle évoque ses sources, cite Brassaï, Atget ou Evans, pionniers d’une photographie de paysages urbains et de scènes de rue, où surgissent des fragments de textes : pêle-mêle des enseignes de boutiques, des affiches publicitaires, des pancartes, des messages politiques etc. Dans une photographie de Walker Evans, dont on dit de lui qu’il a su capter l’Amérique essentielle des années 30, intitulée Roadside Gas Station (1929), on voit se superposer plusieurs écritures, celles faites à la bombe par une main anonyme, créant une phrase «aléatoire»... On peut y lire et y deviner quelque chose comme «Any Old Gas A Change the Reference». A la suite d’Evans, Baum isole ainsi à partir d’objets imprimés ce que Gross nomme des ready-mades sémantiques (2). Ce travail sur le langage est particulièrement éloquent aujourd’hui : comme l’écrit Gold- smith (3) en mettant en lumière la façon dont le langage décrit les systèmes d’information dans les média imprimés, ceux de l’ère Gutenberg, (livres, notices de bibliothèque, coupures de presse etc.), Baum nous fait également réfléchir à la façon dont ce même langage est utilisé en informatique. The Public Imagination selon Baum, c’est aussi une façon de soulever à nouveau la question de la pertinence de nos systèmes de données, et des brèches qu’ils laissent ouvertes quant à nos systèmes de croyance.
Le travail d’Erica Baum a fait l’objet de plusieurs expositions personnelles à la galerie Bureau à New York (2011, 2012), ainsi qu’au Kunstverein Langenhagen (2013), à la galerie Melas Padopoulos à Athènes (2013), à la Biennale de Sao Paulo (2012), à Circuit à Lausanne (2011) ou à la galerie LuttgenMeijer à Berlin (2009). Il a également été présenté dans des expositions collectives telles que Everyday Epiphanies: Photography and Daily Life since 1969 au Metropolitan Museum of Art à New York (2013), The Feverish Library Cont’d à la galerie Capitan Petzel à Berlin (2013), Coquilles Mécaniques au FRAC Alsace (2012) ou encore Journal d’une chambre à la galerie Crèvecoeur (2012). Ses oeuvres sont présentes dans les collections du Whitney Museum of American Art, du Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum et du Metropolitan Museum of Art.

(1) “La Sagesse des foules” est un livre de 2004 de James Surowiecki, qui soutient la thèse suivante : l’agrégation de l’information dans les groupes résulte en décisions sont souvent meilleures que celles d’individus isolés du groupe. Le titre est une allusion à la “Folie des foules” de Charles Mackay, publié en 1841, traitant des -épisodes «contagieux» de folie populaire dans l’histoire.
(2) Béatrice Gross, “Erica Baum’s “wild tumult, (...), of uncertainty,” Or “series of ellipses, hung on around, (...), very subtle in escap- ing...” , in Erica Baum, “Dog Ear”, Ugly Duckling Presse, 2011, Brooklyn, NY
(3) Kenneth Goldsmith, “Wish Me Well and I’ll Love You Still: The Dog Ears of Erica Baum”, in Erica Baum, “Dog Ear”, Ugly Duckling Presse, 2011, Brooklyn, NY

  • The Public Imagination

    exhibition view © Isabelle Giovacchini

  • The Public Imagination

    ensemble composed of 3 posters, Wavy Miami, Sao Paulo Street Tiles 773A, Sau Paulo Street Tiles 754, and of 2 framed photographs, Session (Naked Eye Anthology), Sperm Whales (Newspaper Clippings) © Isabelle Giovacchini

  • The Public Imagination

    Ensemble composed of 5 posters, Wavy Streets 683, Pink Eared Duck 7, Night Scene 329, Background 330, Hot House Art 3, and of 2 framed photographs, Reagan (Naked Eye Anthology), Quiver (Newspaper Clippings), Barney (Naked Eye Anthology), © Isabelle Giovacchini

  • The Public Imagination

    Ensemble composed of 2 posters, Acropolis Columns Art 3, ART from Museum 17, and of 2 framed photographs, Square Chatter (Newspaper Clippings), Head Bend (Naked Eye Anthology), © Isabelle Giovacchini

  • The Public Imagination

    exhibition view © Isabelle Giovacchini

  • The Public Imagination

    untitled (Squirreles flying) (Frick), 1998, gelatin silver print, 34,9 x 45,72 cm (53 x 63 cm framed)

  • The Public Imagination

    untitled (Dragon-flies) (Frick), 1998, gelatin silver print, 29,2 x 48,7 cm (47 x 66 cm framed)

  • The Public Imagination

    Session (Naked Eye Anthology), 2012, archival pigment print, 45,7 x 38,7 cm

  • The Public Imagination

    Sperm Whales (Newspaper Clippings), 2010, archival pigment print, 43,3 x 37,8 cm