Agnosie

Balthazar Lovay

10.11.10 – 08.01.11

Interview between Balthazar Lovay and Fabrice Stroun, november 2010, Genève

Fabrice Stroun:Your new pictures made with a computer play on a saturation effect. Unlike your previous drawings, Noise Drawings, where every stratum remains clear, here the images tend to disappear.
Balthazar Lovay: In both cases, it is about piling images layers. Unlike the drawings handmade, here, through the Photoshop matrix, the more layers you add, the more they seem to vanish. It is a good thing since all those images exhaust me.
FS: How is that? Do you refer to the nature of the images you use or to their number?
BL: Both. Some are images that I have been piling in boxes for years, taken in magazines, books, any kind of prints. Some come from the Internet. A part of them carry an anxious content, slightly paranoiac, some are more ordinary. I have a diogenic trend. By piling up in my boxes, they eventually form an oppressive mass, just like the images all around us every day. It is liberating to see them disappear as I pile them.
FS: In the past, you have worked with this kind of appropriated images in a much more direct way. I refer to your series of watercoulours shown in the Swiss Cultural Centre in Paris, where you stated fantasmatic représentations of Hitler (Vacuumed Images, 2006). Don’t you think it is important for the viewer, to perceive the « material » you work with ?
BL: Not in this case. To be honest, if I use images taken from my « collections », a large amount of them are taken randomly elsewhere, and do not represent something specific for me. This sampling allows me to take distance with my own obsessions, so as to introduce foreign bodies in the mixture, to be sure all the components do not have the same function. It is also important not to establish a norm. What matters is the act of leading all those images to their disappearing.
FS: Is it more important than the final visual result ?
BL: I started the Noise Drawings with a rather intellectual reflexion about the future of abstraction, the héritage of processes coming from Appropriation etc. But in the end, they were treated in a drawing automatic way, almost in a trance state. The pictures made here with a computer are different: it is more about cold handlings made from a computerized cockpit, as in a sci-fi film, where a mad-doctor would force worlds to interpenetrate in a misty collapse. Nevertheless, I wanted the viewer to be connected with the idea of « sublime », thanks notably to the dimensions. I don’t know if it works.
FS: In which extent this image is random, simply the fruits of this computer process, and in which extent is it composed?
BL: It is 86% chance, and 14% composition and settings on luminosity and contrasts. FS: You also present a work from a new series of three-dimensional piece inspired by Appenzeller Sylvester Klau-
sen headgears.
BL: It is a fascinating popular tradition. For New Year’s Eve, men dressed up as women wear masks and big hats on which they built playlets of daily life. As you look closer, you notice that they evoke the position of the man in the world, they deal with its social identification through a glorified vision of the everyday. If you consider them with a critical point of view, those scale-downs also interrogate our distance to the cultural environment, the ambiguous status of any self-representation, the public image that you make people believe in and the private realities that we hide.
The masks and hats that I have been making for less than one year are versions about these allegories, and also about related issues: utopian and eccentric social models, eschatological and spiritual matters, likely or absurd uchronias, etc.
FS: These sculptures are also saturated of images, that keep on merging over each other.
BL: They do, and they litteraly do in some cases. On the walls of the Nochronos for instance stained glasses
are inserted and tey are lit from the inside. You cand find Dürer’s Horsemen of the Apocalypse, a painting by visionary artist Alex Grey, an apocalyptic painting by illustrator Larry Carroll made for Slayer, a philosophical painting by Vero- nese called Dialettica and a Dali version of Piero della Francesca. The urban apocalypse is one of the recurring issues of visionary art, with the idea that the modern town is the paroxysmal expression of our violent domination on our eco- system, that we are heading for a fall, that our towns will finally implode. Salvation would come from a return to shared community values, out of the towns, in the middle of the nature. This option is represented by a 1969 painting of Frank Bruno and by a recent painting by Vidya Gastaldon.
FS: These image associations build a meaning, a readable narrative more than a sensation of generalised confu- sion.
BL: To a certain extent, they do, even if it is here a more allegoric than narrative meaning. The meaning appears and disappears according to the watching point. It applies to the paintings and the sculptures. Currently, I am swayed by the apocalyptic views and the ideas of regeneration promises. But I try to include in it other references, to confuse a too quickly identifiable outline, which could be used as a total position, or to which I would end up by entirely believe in.
FS: Your refusal to adopt a single guideline is reflected in your formal choices. It seems sometimes that each series was made by a different artist. Your work is clearly led by polyphonic attempts. Can you explain the strategies you use to produce these other « voices » ?
BL: Maybe like my previous work of musical programmer, or currently my work of co-manager of Hard Hat, where it is always about bringing together mixed éléments in a specific context. But is also about taking part in several different « worlds », such as extreme Metal with its own iconography, its tours with four bands in two-floor buses, or Balkanic music, with its internal confllicts, its star system... For each of the hats, I put myself in different fictional creator shoes. Here, an esoterist talking about end of world and fertility, there a member of a sect building theories about the future evolutions of homo sapiens, there again a captive locked up for civil disobedience.
FS: Whether it be about the musical genres you quoted or all these odd theories about evolution of our species, all these fields are close to you. Unlike a lot of artists of your generation, you seem to be not an ethnological side, but more like a scholar amateur.
BL: “Scholar” is not appropriate, I don’t pretend to be so, but I let myself go following my interests, which are many, and sometimes contradictory, even if I am not able to identify with them totally. We do know, thanks to Philip K. Dick, David Cronenberg, or more theoretically thanks to Nelson Goodman that what we call reality and truth are overlaps of possible worlds beams and kaleidoscope of subjective perceptions. For this series of sculptures for instance, I asked other artists to make their own hats. Soon, in the middle of my productions, I will show pieces from Kim Soeb Bonin- segni and John Miller, two artists with whom I work through Hard Hat. It is not only about penetrating these cultures or worlds that I own more or less, but also to let external worlds come inside the one I build.


Entretien entre Balthazar Lovay et Fabrice Stroun, novembre 2010, Genève

Fabrice Stroun : Tes nouveaux tableaux réalisés à l’ordinateur jouent sur un effet de saturation. Contraire- ment à tes dessins précédents, les Noise Drawings, où chaque strate superposée restait intelligible, ici les images disparaissent.
Balthazar Lovay : Dans les deux cas, il s’agit d’entasser des couches d’images. Ici, à l’opposé des dessins réalisés à la main, à travers la matrice de Photoshop, plus il y a de couches, plus les images semblent se dissiper. Tant mieux, toutes ces images m’épuisent.
FS : De quelle manière ? Fais-tu référence à la nature des images que tu emploies ou à leur nombre ?
BL : Les deux. Certaines sont des images que j’empile dans des cartons depuis des années, issues de magazines, de livres et d’imprimés de toutes sortes. Certaines proviennent du net. Une partie d’entre elles comportent un fond anxieux, légèrement paranoïaque, d’autres sont plus banales. J’ai une légère tendance diogénique. A force de s’accumuler dans mes cartons, celles-ci finissent par former une masse étouffante, tout comme les images qui nous entourent au quotidien. C’est donc assez libérateur de les voir disparaître sur mon écran au fur et à mesure que je les empile.
FS : Tu as par le passé travaillé avec ce type d’images appropriées de manière beaucoup plus frontale. Je pense entre autre à ta série d’aquarelles exposées au Centre Culturel Suisse de Paris, où tu déclinais des représenta- tions phantasmatiques d’Hitler (Vacuumed Images, 2006). N’est-il pas important, pour le spectateur, de percevoir la «matière» avec laquelle tu travailles ?
BL : Pas dans ce cas-ci. Pour tout dire, si j’emploie des images issues de mes «collections», un bon nombre d’entre elles sont prélevées ailleurs, de manière aléatoire, et n’évoquent rien de particulier pour moi. Ce panachage me permet de prendre de la distance avec mes obsessions, d’introduire dans la soupe des corps étrangers, de m’assurer que tous les ingrédients n’ont pas la même fonction. Et surtout de ne pas établir de norme. Ce qui compte avant tout ici c’est le geste qui consiste à amener toutes ces images à leur disparition.
FS : Plus important que le résultat plastique final ?
BL : J’ai commencé les Noise Drawings par une réflexion plutôt intellectuelle sur le devenir de l’abstraction, l’héritage de processus issus de l’Appropriation, etc. Mais, au final, leur réalisation s’est faite sur le mode du dessin automatique, presque dans un état de transe. Ici, avec ces tableaux réalisés à l’ordinateur, il s’agirait plutôt de froides manipulations effectuées depuis un cockpit informatisé, comme dans un film de science-fiction, où un savant s’amuserait à forcer des mondes à s’interpénétrer dans un grand effondrement vaporeux. Néanmoins, je voulais que le spectateur ait, face à «l’image» finale, un rapport de l’ordre du «sublime», grâce à leur taille notamment. Je ne sais si cela fonctionne.
FS : Dans quelle mesure cette image est-elle aléatoire, le simple fruit de ce processus informatique, et dans quelle mesure celle-ci est composée?
BL : On est à 86% de hasard et à 14% de composition et de réglages sur la luminosité et les contrastes... FS : Tu présentes également une œuvre appartenant à une nouvelle série de pièces tridimensionnelles inspirées
BL : C’est une tradition populaire des plus fascinantes. A la Saint-Sylvestre, des hommes déguisés en femmes portent des masques et des grands chapeaux sur lesquels ils ont construit des scénettes de la vie quotidienne. En y regardant
par les coiffes des Sylvester Klausen appenzellois.
de plus près, on s’aperçoit qu’elles évoquent la place de l’homme dans le monde, qu’elles traitent de son identification sociale au travers d’une vision totalement idéalisée du quotidien. Envisagés sous un angle critique, ces modèles réduits questionnent également notre distance à l’environnement culturel, le statut ambigu de toute représentation de soi, de l’image publique qu’on donne à voir et des réalités privées que l’on cache. Les masques et chapeaux que je réalise depuis un peu moins d’un an sont des variations sur ces allégories, mais également sur des sujets voisins : modèles sociaux utopiques ou fantaisistes, questions d’ordre eschatologique et spirituelles, uchronies probables ou absurdes, etc.
FS : Ces sculptures sont elles aussi saturées «d’images» qui ne cessent de s’abîmer les unes dans les autres.
BL : Oui, et de manière assez littérale dans certains cas. Sur les parois de l’Œuf cosmique, par exemple, sont insérés des vitraux éclairés de l’intérieur. On y croise Les Chevaliers de l’apocalypse de Dürer, un tableau du peintre vision- naire américain Alex Grey, une peinture apocalyptique de l’illustrateur Larry Carroll réalisée pour Slayer, une peinture philosophique de Veronese intitulée Dialettica, ou encore un remix de Piero della Francesca par Dalí. L’apocalypse urbaine est un des thèmes récurrents de l’art visionnaire : l’idée que la ville moderne est l’expression paroxystique de notre rapport de domination brutale sur le monde naturel et sur nous-mêmes, que tout cela va nous mener à notre perte, que ces villes vont finalement imploser. Le salut se trouverait dans un retour à des valeurs communautaires partagées, hors des villes, au milieu de la nature. Cette option est ici représentée par un tableau de 1969 de Frank Bruno et par une peinture récente de Vidya Gastaldon.
FS : Ces associations d’images construisent un sens, un récit lisible, plutôt qu’une sensation de confusion géné- ralisée.
BL : Jusqu’à un certain point, oui, bien qu’il s’agisse ici d’un sens plus allégorique que narratif. Le sens apparaît et disparaît selon le point d’observation. Cela vaut aussi bien pour les tableaux que les sculptures. Dans le cas présent, je suis assez sensible à ces discours apocalyptiques et ces promesses de régénération. Mais j’essaye d’inclure d’autres ré- férences, pour brouiller un schéma de pensée trop rapidement identifiable, pouvant faire l’objet d’un discours totalisant, ou auquel je finirais par croire complètement.
FS : Ton refus d’épouser une ligne directrice unique se réfléchit dans tes choix formels. On a parfois l’impression que chaque série a été réalisée par un artiste différent. Ton travail est clairement animé de velléités polyphoni- ques. Peux-tu expliciter les stratégies que tu emploies pour produire ces autres «voix» ?
BL : Peut-être est-ce un peu à l’image de mes anciennes fonctions de programmateur musical ou, actuellement, de co- gestionnaire de Hard Hat où il s’agit toujours de réunir des éléments hétérogènes dans un contexte particulier. Mais il s’agit aussi de participer à des «mondes» différents, comme le Metal extrême avec son iconographie, ses tournées à quatre groupes dans des bus à deux étages, ou la musique balkanique avec ses dissensions internes, et son système de starification, etc. Pour chacun de ces chapeaux, je me suis mis dans la peau d’un concepteur imaginaire différent. Ici, un ésotériste qui parle de fin du monde et de fertilité ; pour un autre, je suis un membre d’une secte développant une nouvelle théorie sur les évolutions à venir d’homo sapiens ; pour un autre encore, j’imagine être un prisonnier enfermé pour désobéissance civile, etc.
FS : Qu’il s’agisse des genres musicaux que tu as cités ou de ces théories bizarroïdes sur l’évolution de notre espèce : tous ces champs te sont proches. Contrairement à de nombreux artistes de ta génération, tu ne te places pas en position d’ethnologue, mais en amateur érudit.
BL : «Erudit» est un bien trop grand mot, mais je me laisse guider par mes intérêts, qui sont multiples et parfois contra- dictoires, sans pour autant être capable de m’y identifier entièrement. On sait, grâce à Philip K. Dick ou David Cronen- berg, et plus théoriquement avec des gens comme Nelson Goodman, que ce que nous appelons le réel ou la vérité sont des télescopages de faisceaux de mondes possibles et des kaléidoscopes de perceptions subjectives. Pour cette série de sculptures, par exemple, j’ai demandé à d’autres artistes de réaliser leurs propres chapeaux. Ainsi, au milieu de mes productions, j’exposerai bientôt des pièces de Kim Soeb Boninsegni et de John Miller, deux artistes avec qui je travaille d’ailleurs à travers Hard Hat. Il n’est donc pas seulement question de pénétrer ces cultures ou ces théories, qui m’appar- tiennent plus ou moins, mais de laisser rentrer des mondes extérieurs à moi au sein de ce que je construis.

  • Agnosie

    Agnosie, 2011, exhibition View, Crèvecoeur

  • Agnosie

    Agnosie, 2011, exhibition View, Crèvecoeur

  • Agnosie

    Nochronos 6 (série Nochronos), 2010, mixed media, 96 x 69 x 96 cm © Lê Chau Cuong

  • Agnosie

    i l'é maäda. I fou a té chonye, 2007-2010, digital print on canvas, 202 x 135 cm © Lê Chau Cuong

  • Agnosie

    untitled, 2010, colored pencil on paper, 27,2 x 20,8 cm